Illustrations - Secret Uses For 16:9 Cinema-Wide Receiver/Monitors

ProScan PS34190 Cinema Screen Receiver/Monitor
ProScan Cinema Screen Receiver/Monitor

Flat movie from normal video release viewed in normal video mode:

Black object at top of frame is the microphone boom, which is visible in the home but was not visible at the theater. Frame from The Bad News Bears Copyright 1976 Paramount Pictures Corp.

Flat movie from normal video release viewed in cinema Mode A:

Cropping in Mode A is superior, in fact nearly identical to the theatrical version of "flat" films made since 1953. Frame from The Bad News Bears Copyright 1976 Paramount Pictures Corp.

Scope movie from letterbox video release viewed in cinema Mode A:

Mode A blows up the letterbox image to the largest, uncropped viewing of the theatrical version on a 16:9 set. Frame from Braveheart Copyright 1995 B. H. Finance C. V.

Scope movie from letterbox video viewed in cinema Mode B:

Mode B blows up the letterbox image to fill the 16:9 screen's height, cropping the sides with little aesthetic damage. Frame from Braveheart Copyright 1995 B. H. Finance C. V.

Super 35 movie from letterbox video viewed in cinema Mode A:

Mode A blows up the letterbox image to the largest, uncropped viewing of the theatrical version on a 16:9 set. Frame from Apollo 13 Copyright 1995 Universal City Studios, Inc.

Super 35 movie from standard video viewed in normal 4:3 mode:

Standard video release adds height to the image, revealing a great deal of unessential detail below the theatrical frame. Frame from Apollo 13 Copyright 1995 Universal City Studios, Inc.

Super 35 movie from standard video viewed in cinema Mode A:

Mode A blows up the Super 35 image to the fill the 16:9 screen in a perfect compromise: filling the screen, eliminating black bars, preserving all essential visual information and cropping away some needless legroom. Frame from Apollo 13 Copyright 1995 Universal City Studios, Inc.

Back To Article