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Bryston BP-26DA Stereo Preamplifier with Built-in DAC

Part II

November, 2007

John E. Johnson, Jr.

 

In Use

For the listening tests, I used a McIntosh MCD201 SACD player, Lamm M2.2 power amplifiers, and Carver Amazing Mark IV ribbon speakers. A Squeezebox wireless music server was used for the DAC music tests, receiving music files (*.wma) from a server located in another building. A coaxial cable was connected to the Squeezebox coaxial digital output and the DAC-1 coaxial input on the Bryston preamplifier. Cables were Legenburg and Nordost.
 

This Telarc SACD (SACD-60595) has a newer version of my favorite Telarc recording of Copland's Fanfare for the Common Man. It is not as thunderous as the original one that I love, but it still is a real test for any hi-fi component.

The BP-26DA delivered all of the bass in the music, and one of the power amplifiers shut down for a second (when it senses clipping, it disconnects the speaker output to prevent damage to the speaker). Of course, I had the volume up too loud anyway, but I wanted to see if the Bryston could put out high current demands in strong bass passages. Obviously, it did.

 

 

This Telarc (SACD-60636) recording of the Mozart Requiem makes me think of the fabulous movie Amadeus. The orchestra, chorus, and soloists were blasting away full tilt, but everything (instruments and voices) remained distinct. This is a testimony to low IMD, which you will see in the On the Bench section of this review.

 

I don't normally like classical music that has been adapted in jazz fashion, but this Telarc disc (SACD-63590) is excellent.

As a percussionist myself, I always look for clarity in the way the cymbals are played, and they had a sheen in the recording that I really enjoyed.

 

If you look at the cover of this Telarc SACD (SACD-60630), you might think these guys are playing chamber music. However, the rear listing of the tracks tells you that it is jazz.

What I listened for was the detail of each instrument across the soundstage, and I don't see how it could get any better than this.

 

 

Go to Part III.

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