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Denon AVR-2807 7.1 A/V Receiver

Part II

October, 2006

Piero Gabucci



Analog video inputs include both composite and S-Video for all input sources already mentioned, along with audio outputs for 2 VCR, Zone 2, and a monitor. The 2807 features three component inputs (all at 100 MHz), and added was a second component output for more than one monitor. This is a nice feature, as some people may have, for example, a TV and projector controlled from the 2807.

Digital inputs include two coaxial and four optical, with two optical outputs.

Click on the photo above to see a larger version.

The 2807 has two HDMI inputs and single HDMI output. An XM radio connection, along with tuner antenna including an FM coax, round out the left side of the unit. Surprisingly I would have thought Denon might include the proprietary Link 3 technology for other Denon products, but you'll need to spend about $200 and upgrade to the 3806 for this feature.

An RS-232 port for an outside controller along with in/out remote control and two assignable 12v trigger outs round out the features on the back. Denon does provide two AC 120v 60 Hz outlets and a removable power cord, always welcome. Lastly you'll still notice Denon stamps right on the back of the receiver the impedance for speakers from 6 - 16 ohms. If you have 4 ohm speakers, well, you make the call.

Lastly, a curious little connection called Dock Control. Ah well, how can we forget iPod, sold separately is an iPod docking station. This also allows the 2807's remote to control the iPod.

Internally Speaking, Processing and More

As I mentioned, the AVR-2807 offers fully discrete amplification 110 WPC with a THD at a low 0.05% (untested). Processing is handled by a new 32-bit floating point DSP for 24-bit/192 kHz signals.

Getting back to all those logos on the front of the 2807, let me take you through more of them.

The 2807 supports all the current surround processing out there by Dolby and DTS. For Dolby that means Dolby Digital EX and the older Pro logic IIx. For DTS this includes DTS-Es, 96/24 and DTS Neo:6. I might also mention here that the 2807 features a night mode for improved dialogue listening to Dolby Digital sources when the volume is turned down.

The new Denon offers multi-zone capability: a full 5.1 setup in one room and an independent two-channel zone. If you'd prefer, you could bi-amp the fronts with those two additional channels if no second zone is used.

Getting to the meat of the AVR-2807 is its HDMI capabilities. Audio-wise, a compatible DVD player and a single cable will transmit multi-channel audio. If you're a fan of the format like I am, all those interconnect cables are now required for SACD only.

It's really the important video issues though that makes the 2807 remarkable. Firstly, with HDMI version 1.1 compliance, 1080p is possible. Although not new, there is conversion (transcoding) of video signals from composite, S-Video, and component sources to HDMI. Denon incorporates a time base correction or TBC to control jitter from composite or S-Video sources.

The 2807 transcodes interlaced composite and S-Video to progressive 480i to 480p for example. From component, it will take those 1080i signals and convert to 1080p. I'll discuss this further in the setup.

Not unlike other Denon receivers, auto-setup and room EQ are included. What's astoundingly new to this level of receiver is the Audyssey MultEQ. For those unfamiliar with Audyssey, readings through a microphone are taken at several locations in your room not just from one "sweet-spot".

The 2807 offers three user mode memory settings. This feature allows you to store the input source and mode along with the surround mode you've assigned. You may also assign tone control and playback levels to each mode.

Click Here to Go to Part III.

Copyright 2006 Secrets of Home Theater & High Fidelity

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