Subwoofers

Epik Conquest Subwoofer

ARTICLE INDEX

While a wood veneer finish is offered, the main finish of the Conquest is a textured black. According to Epik, the coating they use is an energy absorbing coating used by the military as part of body and vehicle armor. While I don't know if it will stop a bullet, in my experience it does seem scratch resistant. In fact, in reminds me a bit of a spray in tuck bed liner - admittedly a much more glossy and smooth finish than you'll find in most pickups.

Subjectively, I found that the enclosure of the Conquest was well built. All attached components of the system such as the driver and ports were attractively flush mounted within tight tolerances. The enclosure edges were nicely rounded over. The black finish itself would best be described as functional. It is not as nice as some of the furniture grade finishes I have seen on other speakers, such as the ERA Design 5 speakers and subwoofer I previously reviewed. On close inspection, I was able to detect a flaw or two in the enclosure finish at the corners. In these cases, I could detect the underlying seam through the finish. However, this is inconsequential. Overall, for a subwoofer of this size, I'd say it could blend into a typical dimly lit home theater.

Driver and Ports

The driver of the Conquest is impressive. It is a proprietary design of Epik's, being an American made 18" driver weighing in at nearly 70 pounds! It features a paper cone, reinforced with Kevlar for piston like stiffness, three inches of excursion, and 3000 Watts of power handling capacity. This baby moves some air! Speaking of air, dual 6" or cat sized (trust me) flared ports are used along with this massive driver. According to Epik, these ports allow the driver " . . . to perform virtually unhindered by compression".

Amplifier

As you can see from the picture of it removed from the enclosure, the amplifier for the Conquest is almost as impressive looking as the driver. Although there's neither a big toroidal transformer nor much heft that one would traditionally equate with amplifier quality, based on its ratings, the physical size is deceiving. The Conquest uses a BASH / Indigo design customized specifically for Epik. This particular design falls into the Class D switching category of amplifiers, a category known for its high efficiency. With an RMS rating of 1,000 watts that peaks even higher, it can definitely get the job done, as you'll see below.

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Connectivity and Control

For connectivity, the Conquest offers the typical high level (speaker) and low level (RCA) inputs. The low level inputs have a pass-though feature to allow daisy chaining multiple subs. It does not offer the balanced inputs found on some other subs. Balanced XLR inputs can offer better noise immunity than unbalanced low level inputs provide. However, with my 15 foot run of Monster Subwoofer RCA cable, this was not an issue.

To allow seamless integration with the rest of the speaker system, the Conquest provides: a fully variable crossover control from 50 to 150 Hz, fully variable phase control from 0 to 180 degrees, and a fully variable level or output control. The ability to completely bypass the internal crossover in favor of using an SSP crossover is a nice addition.

Power to the Conquest can be set to On if you plan on controlling the sub with a master power conditioner / controller or Auto to turn on automatically when bass signal is present. I found that the power cable provided was a touch loose and had no ground prong. If I were to keep the sub I'd replace that cable. Also, if I had a choice, I'd prefer that a ground be included on the Conquest's amp with an option to lift the ground to eliminate any possible ground loop hum would it become necessary.