Receivers

Marantz SR6003 7.1 A/V Receiver

ARTICLE INDEX

Calibration and the Remote

Marantz SR6003 7.1 A/V Receiver

Marantz SR6003 7.1 A/V Receiver

The on-screen menus on the Marantz were very easy to navigate. While I don’t think the basic white text on a blue background GUI design will win any awards, it was well laid out, easy to navigate, and didn’t slow me down in any way. In fact, I was able to accomplish most setup tasks without even glancing at the very clearly written user manual. One feature I loved was the ability to rename any of the inputs using an on-screen keyboard. While it took a bit of time to do this using the remote, it was well worth the effort. This will most likely make it much easier for family members to find the appropriate input if you are not around to turn things on. After all, who really knows what source “Aux2” controls besides you?

Marantz SR6003 7.1 A/V Receiver

Speaking of the remote, the fully programmable unit included with the SR6003 is not too bad as far as stock remotes go. It has full macro and learning capability as well as being fully backlit. However, I couldn’t find a way to adjust the time that the backlighting stayed on. Also, many of the frequently used buttons while in “AMP” mode (which controls the receiver), such as “Pure/Source Direct,” “EQ,” “M-Dax,” “Lip Sync,” and “Mute” are not labeled on the backlit buttons, but rather in small text on the black plastic above the buttons, making them almost impossible to find without turning the lights on.

Marantz has also decided that you must push a source button twice before the receiver decides to change to the new input, an odd decision if you ask me. I also had issues with the range on the stock remote. Despite being only about 11 feet from the receiver and at an angle of barely 20 degrees, I had problems with the receiver responding to remote commands. I quickly found myself creating a new configuration file for my Home Theater Master MX-850 remote to control the SR6003. The issues with the receiver failing to respond to commands disappeared when using the MX-850.

The SR6003 was my first experience with the Audyssey MultEQ processing system. Following the clearly written instructions in the manual and from the on-screen display, I performed my first Audyssey calibration using the maximum number of measurements allowed by MultEQ; six. Audyssey nailed all speaker distances and trim levels perfectly. The crossover point to my “small” surround and center speakers was still a bit higher than I’d like at 100Hz, but it was close. While on the topic of crossover points, one thing I’d like to see Marantz implement is the ability to set crossover points individually per speaker. My center channel will easily do 60Hz in my room, and my left and right surrounds will go down to about 50-55Hz. My back surrounds are smaller and start to fall off around 90Hz. Audyssey uses a “least common denominator” approach and sets the crossover point based upon the -3 Db level of your smallest speakers. After running Audyssey, I just went back into the setup menu and lowered the crossover point to the THX recommended spec of 80Hz.