Projectors

JVC X30 1080p Three-Chip D-ILA 3D Projector

ARTICLE INDEX

The JVC X30 Projector On the Bench

The X30 features a partial CMS, whereas the X70 and X90 models have one an THX/ISF modes. The calibration was performed after 100 hours were put on the bulb, using CalMan 4.5, an i1Pro and i1Display Pro, and a Quantum Data 882E. On my 122" 2.40 Screen Innovations Solar HD screen, the 6000K temperature preset measured right around 6700K and was the closest mode to start with. The two point grayscale controls in the X30 let me dial in the 80% and 30% values to very close to reference and the rest of the grayscale came into line after that. The dE across the grayscale was under 3 and while it could have been adjusted even more, that was good enough.

Before

After

Before

After

Since I have a totally light controlled room, I aimed for a gamma of 2.3 and used the custom gamma settings on the JVC to get there. I set Custom 1 to a gamma of 2.3 that measured very close to the target, leaving me a gamma of 2.25. You can further tweak the gamma settings with individual point controls, but I found that doing so causes image posterization. The small benefit to gamma is certainly not worth the loss of image quality you would get from doing this so I would leave those adjustments alone.

Before

After

With the lack of a CMS I wasn't able to get the colors perfect, but the Standard color mode was pretty close to the Rec. 709 color points, and I was able to use the Color control to get the luminance level adjusted. Even with no controls, the only color that showed a dE 1994 over 3 at the end was blue, which is where we want our color error to lie. The JVC gamut is large enough that you can use an external CMS, like a Lumagen Radiance, if you really want to get the image perfect. I did for some viewing and it looked phenomenal.

Before

After

After calibration, with the iris fully open, the lamp on normal, and a 1.3 gain, 96" 16:9 screen I had over 22 ftL of light with a full white pattern, which was very bright for watching in darkness. When I used the zoom feature to totally fill the 122" 2.40 screen the light level dropped down to around 15 ftL, which was still very good for watching a movie in darkness. Later on you could add an anamorphic lens to the JVC, as it supports both anamorphic modes, and avoid this light loss for cinemascope screens.

With the lamp in normal mode and measuring directly off the lens, I measured an on/off contrast after calibration of around 17,000:1. With the lamp on high, that improved to 27,000:1 and it got all the way to 37,000:1 using the smallest lens aperture. Though screen dependent, I did measure the contrast ratio off the screen and my low black reading would shift between unreadable, or 0.001 ftL, giving me a contrast ratio of over 20,000:1 from my screen.

Before

After

After calibration, the only measurement that didn't fall perfectly in line was the blue dE measurement, which is the least important of all the measurements we take, and leaves the JVC with a near perfect calibrated image. You can see from the test bench results that the JVC handles all colorspaces quite well, and the only issues I found were with component video, which really isn't much of an issue anymore. Since HDMI syncing took a couple of seconds on the JVC it's hard to be sure how quickly it locked onto every test pattern, but it had no issues losing that cadence lock with them, and overall performance was excellent.