HDTV

Toshiba 55ZL2 4K LCD 3D Display

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The HD and Blu-ray Toshiba 55ZL2

The interesting part, of course, is how Toshiba achieves this feat, and it is no simple matter. The lenslet layer is very delicate, and somehow, Toshiba has found a way to turn it off completely.

The patterns caused by this disabling of the lenslet layer leave the pixels as circular in shape while in 2D mode.. I am not really sure Toshiba achieves this, but it's nothing short of magical.

Since most people do not have 4K content, we're going to stick with 1080p content coming from Blu-ray. The Resolution+ system upscales that content to the 4K screen. While this is somewhat of a compromise, you can definitely tell the screen is sharper than any other screen without it introducing significant halo artifacts. The pixels are simply that much sharper – so the effect is quite dramatic.

One of my favorites Blu-ray's is The Fifth Element in its remastered form. It is sharp, has a noticeable grain pattern which gives it a nice edge. I have been testing with the Leeloo birth scene ever since the CUE bug was shown by Spears & Munsil in the DVD days…

I could not see any artifacts resulting from the upscale from 1080p to 4K. The scars on the scientist's face were detailed and perfect.

Forget what you know about HDTV….

Inglorious Basterds had the same immersive effect. The sharpness was amazing.

The first signs of trouble were with Sin City, which has an amazing range of contrast. The nature of this movie forces a display to show its real contrast abilities and the ZL2 kept the backlight on for far too long – causing blacks to be much grayer than I would have hoped.

Gone are the days of backlit local dimmed LED displays, and it's too bad – this is where it would have really paid off.

Broadcast HDTV was far fuzzier than Blu-ray. The difference was much more noticeable than on a 1080p screen.