Blu-ray Players

Yamaha BD-S1065 Blu-ray Player

ARTICLE INDEX

Setup

There is definitely some real convenience associated with HDMI-based hardware. Setup of the Yamaha took me no more than five minutes. I ran the power cable to my power conditioner and the single HDMI cable to a free input on my Integra DHC-9.9 pre-pro. Since I wanted to check out the BD-S1065’s analog sound quality with music, I also ran a pair of analog RCA cables from the stereo outputs of the Yamaha to my pre-pro. I then powered up the Yamaha and entered the on-screen setup menus. The setup menus were clear and easy to follow. I found that I didn’t need the manual at all during the initial setup, which is a testament to the BD-S1065's well thought-out GUI design.

The only menu choices that I needed to consult the manual on were the “Dynamic Range Control” and “Quick Start” features. I left the “Dynamic Range Control” on “Normal,” which does not apply any sort of limiting or compression to the source signal. I also turned on “Quick Start” which decreases the start up time of the unit from about 40 seconds to less than 2 seconds, a nice performance boost indeed. The only side effects of “Quick Start” are an increase in “Stand-by” power consumption from 0.7 Watts to 10 Watts (HDMI CEC adds .5W) and an increase in the shut down time of the unit from about 8 seconds to 35 seconds or more. As much as I enjoyed the fast start-up time of “Quick Start,” I’d like to see Yamaha get this same performance without so much extra power consumption. I would also like to point out that Yamaha has included fairly robust bass-management and distance compensation settings if you use the analog outputs. The only thing missing was an adjustable crossover point for bass management, but the default 80Hz setting should work for most users.

Before playing any discs, I checked the Yamaha website to make sure that my player’s firmware was up-to-date. It wasn’t, so I downloaded the latest 1.09 version to my PC and then copied the file to a USB thumb-drive. The Yamaha can only perform firmware updates via USB or CD, not the built-in Ethernet port. This is a bit of a head-scratcher for me. If you are going to the trouble of making the player BD-Live capable with an included Ethernet port, why not let it connect to the internet for firmware updates as well? Sadly, Yamaha confirmed that Ethernet firmware updates are not on the roadmap for this player. Regardless, the firmware update went smoothly and was completed in less than 15 minutes.